So…How Does This Thing Work?

Wait, you press what, now??

Well, as I am a few months into things here at my first assignment, I’ve been trying to figure out some good ways to put my seminary formation to use.  So, Dr. Mahfood, this one’s for you.

“Among the wonderful technological discoveries which men of talent, especially in the present era, have made with God’s help, the Church welcomes and promotes with special interest those which have a most direct relation to men’s minds and which have uncovered new avenues of communicating most readily news, views and teachings of every sort. The most important of these inventions are those media which, such as the press, movies, radio, television and the like, can, of their very nature, reach and influence, not only individuals, but the very masses and the whole of human society, and thus can rightly be called the media of social communication.”

The above is an excerpt from the first paragraph of the Second Vatican Council’s document on social communication (I bet you didn’t even know there was one!  I didn’t!), entitled Inter Mirifica.  Now, blogs and Facebook and Youtube didn’t make the list, but I doubt this was on their minds in 1963.  But it’s no secret that technology and social communication are important aspects to my ministry as a priest, and, on the grander scale, they are important means of spreading the Gospel in the digital age.  In fact, Pope Benedict himself told us this in his message to priests regarding the use of new media at the service of the world, given in May 2010.

“Priests stand at the threshold of a new era: as new technologies create deeper forms of relationship across greater distances, they are called to respond pastorally by putting the media ever more effectively at the service of the Word…. Who better than a priest, as a man of God, can develop and put into practice, by his competence in current digital technology, a pastoral outreach capable of making God concretely present in today’s world and presenting the religious wisdom of the past as a treasure which can inspire our efforts to live in the present with dignity while building a better future?”

So here you go.  This is my little attempt to present “the religious wisdom of the past as a treasure” to whoever might run across it.  My plan is to link to various articles, present topics that I feel are applicable and (dare I say) important to the world today, and post some of my homilies for reflection.  I only ask the intercession of St. Isidore, the patron saint of the Internet (I bet you didn’t know there was one of those either!), that this new endeavor might bear fruit in this, the garden, the building of the Church.